SCOTUS Nominee Gorsuch – A Look ahead

Last night, President Trump nominated 10th Circuit Court of Appeals Judge Neil Gorsuch to the Supreme Court. A graduate of Columbia, Harvard Law and Oxford, Gorsuch studied under the preeminent moral philosopher John Finnis. His firm grounding in sound legal reasoning and the natural law means he will not concern himself with the outcome of a case but rather with the reasoning and logic behind it. That won’t be popular with those who like to use the courts to achieve their desired ends. Let the circus begin. Read

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Redefining “Sex” in the Transgender Debate

On August 23, doctors, hospitals and five states filed a lawsuit against the government, challenging a new regulation implementing Obama’s Affordable Care Act (Obamacare). The new rule requires physicians who accept federal funds to perform transgender surgeries on children and adults, even if doing so conflicts with a physician’s professional medical judgement or belief that such a procedure would be harmful, dangerous or not in the best interests of a patient’s health. Read

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Little Sisters, Big Rights And The Supreme Court

On November 6, the Supreme Court announced that it will hear the case of The Little Sisters of the Poor, the fourth legal challenge to Obamacare heard by the Court since Obamacare was passed. Why is this case significant? The Court will finally take up a key constitutional question that it did not touch in the Hobby Lobby case: Does the government have a “compelling interest” in ensuring that American employers pay full coverage for contraception and abortion drugs for their employees? Read

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Broad Threats to Liberties In Light of SSM Decision

On Friday, June 26, the U.S. Supreme Court legalized same-sex marriage across the nation by a slim 5-4 vote in the case, Obergefell v. Hodges. I offer below a simple breakdown of the ruling and its implications. What Did The … Read

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Relativism or Relativity: Religious Freedom and the Family

In Relativism or Relativity: Religious Freedom and the Family Professor Shivanandan illuminates the debate about religion and the public square by throwing a searching light on antithetical understandings of human freedom, particularly religious freedom. A popular understanding is that freedom … Read

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When Medical Care Gets Expensive: Economic Considerations in the Removal of Life Support

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WASHINGTON, D.C., NOV. 17, 2010 (Zenit.org).- Here is a question on bioethics asked by a ZENIT reader and answered by the fellows of the Culture of Life Foundation.

Q: Is it ever legitimate to remove or withhold life-sustaining procedures from a patient in order to save excessive expenses to persons other than that patient (e.g., the patient’s family, the community)? — W.G., Denver, USA

E. Christian Brugger offers the following response:

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